21 posts categorized "Transgender"

November 20, 2015

TDOR: Honoring in Different Ways


Today is international Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR), a time when people all over the world unite in support of our transgender community and honor the memory of those murdered because of anti-transgender prejudice. If you're in NYC and wish to join SAGE, our SAGE Center Midtown will be hosting a vigil starting at 6:45 PM this evening. We are located at 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, New York, NY (between 27 and 28th Streets). That said, the following serves a reminder that not everyone may want to take part in TDOR events. Originally featured on FORGE's website as part of their #30DaysofAction, you can read the original here.

This weekend many communities will be holding TDOR and/or Trans March of Resilience events. TDOR is hard for many people. While some are comforted and feel supported by gathering together to mourn those who had their lives taken by anti-transgender violence, others feel more painful emotions.  For many, being reminded of this severity of violence can stimulate intense fear and sometimes a sense of hopelessness.  Many avoid attending TDOR events altogether.

There is NOTHING wrong with you or others if you cannot or do not want to attend TDOR events (or read or hear about them, either).

Think about the trans people you know: are any not planning on attending a TDOR? Does anyone express distress or avoid discussing TDORs altogether? If so, consider creating an alternative.

  • Create a distraction: organize an outing to an upbeat movie, host a card party, or take a friend shopping (don’t forget secondhand stores if money is limited!). You don’t lose your “trans card” for taking care of yourself and/or your friends.
  • Offer a listening ear. Sometimes what feels most healing is getting long-buried feelings out in the open. This can happen anywhere, at any time, but you can also offer it to the community: put on social media that you will be at X coffeehouse at X time if anyone wants to drop by and talk or just sit together.
  • Encourage people to engage in self-care. This year, in particular, the trans community has been in almost constant mourning for our dead. Sometimes the way we can best honor our dead is by valuing our own lives, which includes self-care when we need it.


November 19, 2015

Issues of Aging in the M2F Trans Community

In recognition of Transgender Awareness Week, SAGE and the National Resource Center on LGBT Aging will be highlighting one resource a day until Friday, November 20th which is the Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR). Today's resource is actually a first-person account from Cici Kyttten, on what it's like to age as a male to female trans person.

CiciAs a maturing M2F trans person who is maturing much too rapidly for my own taste, I find myself facing a whole new set of personal issues that I hadn’t considered before. Superficial issues like physical appearance and body image come immediately to mind. These are the same kinds of issues that aging women have faced for generations.

 And those issues are important. Most of us take great pride in our appearance. After all, we’ve spent a lifetime obsessing over it. At first hiding our femme sides, then cultivating them, and then finetuning them as we progressed. So when we see the fruits of all that effort slipping away, it hurts. 

The whole aging process can be especially discouraging to those who came into this world later in life.  We missed all the young years. The fun years. The skinny years!  Consequently, many of us have been fighting the impacts of aging since we started dressing.

But sagging bodies and laugh lines may be the least of our problems.There are a whole host of other issues -- including health concerns, health care, retirement, personal finances, and living accommodations -- that all aging individuals face but become more complicated because we are trans.  

I recently had a rather frank conversation with my doctor about the negative impact that wearing high heels might have on my arthritic knees. Obviously, this is not a conversation my doctor would normally expect to have with a 50-something American male. But, for me, it was instructive. It was a conversation that needed to happen. Unfortunately, at this point in our society, most trans people aren’t comfortable admitting their trans nature to their doctor or other health professionals. And that lack of communication can hinder proper health care -- particularly in matters much more critical than arthritis.

Unemployment and underemployment are rampant in the trans community. This can have a devastating impact on our ability to plan for the future and save for retirement. Even those who have planned appropriately may find themselves changing career paths as they transition or become more out about their trans nature. Changing careers -- and quite often reducing one’s income in the process -- can have a detrimental effect on benefits and investment strategies. 

Aging can be even more complex for those who have transitioned to living full time.  One must be mindful of -- and prepared to face -- challenges related to identity issues, particularly with regard to end-of-life documents, Medicare, access to health care, monitoring of medications associated with transition, and fair housing practices.

But probably the most daunting aspect of aging for most trans people is the prospect of growing old alone. Perhaps we’ve alienated or been ostracized by loved ones by coming out.  Perhaps we’ve lost touch with loved ones due to feelings of shame or embarrassment.  Or maybe we’ve simply chosen to live single and free of family responsibilities -- and therefore now find ourselves aging with no blood relatives in our lives.

Regardless of the reason, many of us are growing old alone.  A recent Harris Poll conducted on behalf of SAGE, indicates that LGBT individuals are more likely than their non-LGBT counterparts to live alone and experience diminishing support networks. One in three LGBT elders is concerned about “being lonely and growing old alone.”

And I’m one of them. 

I have a great network of friends. Over the years they’ve provided me with the support and confidence I’ve needed to lead a fairly open, productive and fulfilling trans life. But friends are not traditionally the people we turn to take care of us as we age. Blood connections and marital bonds take precedence. Sometimes for legal reasons. Sometimes for personal reasons.  

Fortunately, there is cause for hope. Just as LGBT support services increased around the country as the LGBT communities emerged from their respective closets, services for LGBT elders are now increasing as those communities mature.  

The Los Angeles Times recently reported on the Los Angeles LGBT Center’s first “Senior Prom” - for LGBT couples over 50 years of age. And Stonewall Gardens opened an assisted-living property offering resort-style accommodations, a full-time licensed nurse, and a 24-hour professional care staff -- the first complex of its kind in the Palm Springs, CA area. Hopefully, trans-specific programs, events, and institutions will follow these LGBT models.

My research for this article turned up a fairly extensive amount of resources devoted to LGBT elder issues. One great place to start is your local LGBT Center. SAGE’s Natinoal Resource Center on LGBT Aging also has an excellent list of online resources related to aging. Of particular interest is their publication, Improving the Lives of Transgender Older Adults: Recommendations for Policy and Practice -- published in conjunction with the National Center for Transgender Equality.

Growing old is something we all must face.  And the trans population faces very real and distinct challenges. But as more of us come out and advocate for equal services, we now have a better chance to grow old gracefully -- with better access to housing, health care, and emotional support.

Cici Kyttten is one of the most prolific writers today in relation to transgender (M2F) lifestyle topics. She lives on the West Coast (USA), and spends her time between LA and Las Vegas. She has a dedicated following of avid fans on her Blog . Cici’s Articles are meant to inspire and inform those who are new to the community as well create provocative dialogue with seasoned Trans Girls. Cici wrote this article on behalf of Suddenly Fem, an exclusive fashion line designing career-wear to club wear for the transgender M2F and crossdressing community. They have been innovating fashions and accessories for over 20 years and in 2013, created a community outreach program in which they help to serve the trans community with information, donations and financial support.

November 18, 2015

Transgender Aging: What's Different?

In recognition of Transgender Awareness Week, SAGE and the National Resource Center on LGBT Aging will be highlighting one resource a day until Friday, November 20th which is the Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR).
Despite Caitlyn Jenner (66) coming forward this year with a gorgeous Vanity Fair cover and the Amazon Prime show Transparent receiving numerous accolades, including an Emmy for its cisgender lead Jeffrey Tambor, aging poses unique challenges for transgender older adults. They came of age during decades when transgender people were heavily stigmatized and pathologized. Some came out and made gender transitions during these years, while many others kept their identities hidden for decades and are now coming out and transitioning later in life. Many challenges facing transgender elders are common to the broader older lesbian, gay and bisexual population, but some are different. With a growing older transgender population, there is an urgent need to understand the challenges that can threaten financial security, health and overall well-being. 
CaptureTransgender older adults face barriers in areas such as violence, employment and housing discrimination, privacy and documentation issues, a limited knowledge base, community support and engagement, and more. To learn more about these topics, check out our highlighted resource for the day: Improving the Lives of Transgender Older Adults, authored by SAGE and the National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE).
For a quick rundown of the report, SAGE and NCTE discovered that a lack of cultural and clinical competence regarding transgender people and their health needs, as well as bias and outright discrimination by providers, created serious barriers to quality care for transgender older adults. These barriers, together with financial barriers, mean that many transgender older adults often avoid or delay seeking care. In addition, medically necessary care related to gender transition is often arbitrarily excluded from public and private insurance, despite the Affordable Care Act (ACA) suggesting otherwise. Inability to access this care can contribute to declining health, and these exclusions are often also used to deny coverage for preventive and other medical care transgender older adults need.

The confluence of widespread discrimination across the lifespan, weaker support networks, and barriers to quality care contribute to poor health outcomes for many transgender older people. Transgender people report higher rates of disability, general poor health, depression, anxiety, loneliness and suicidal ideation. Thus, many transgender elders enter their later years with severe health concerns yet without the social and community supports necessary to address them.

In addition, even though today's aging services network provides a wide range of critical services for older adults, this network is currently ill-equipped to provide competent and nondiscriminatory services to transgender older adults, or to address their unique needs. Few aging providers offer cultural competence training or outreach specific to transgender communities. Many transgender older adults are not getting the support they need, and many are reluctant to seek services at all.

SAGE and other organizations are working on creating policies as well as some key solutions for addressing these barriers. To help inform and create this advocacy roadmap, SAGE brought together a diverse committee of leading experts from around the country, which identified several immediate policy and practice priorities to improve the lives of transgender older adults. In the meantime, you can learn more about transgender aging and supports via the National Resource Center on LGBT Aging.


November 17, 2015

Transgender Awareness Week: Looking at Sexual Violence in the Community

ForgeIn recognition of Transgender Awareness Week, SAGE and the National Resource Center on LGBT Aging will be highlighting one resource a day until Friday, November 20th which is the Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR). TDOR honors the memory of those murdered because of anti-transgender prejudice and is observed in late November in recognition of the 1998 murder of Rita Hester. Rita was a highly visible member of the transgender community in Boston, where she worked locally on education around transgender issues. On Saturday, Nov 28, Rita was murdered in her apartment. TDOR was started as a vigil in her honor and has since become an international event for communities to come together and remember those who have been murdered because of hate.

Did you know that fifty percent (50%) or more of all transgender and gender non-conforming people have experienced some form of sexual abuse, sometimes from many different people over many years? In order to help heal and educate, FORGE recently came out with Transgender Sexual Violence Survivors: A Self-Help Guide to Healing and Understanding.  This substantial document includes information about the prevalence of sexual violence against transgender/gender non-conforming individuals, lists common long- and short-term responses to trauma and offers practical advice and resources for survivors and those helping them. Please click here to access the resource. FORGE's mission is to support, educate and advocate for the rights and lives of transgender individuals and SOFFAs (Significant Others, Friends, Family, and Allies) and they provide valuable training services as well as information on their site. Find them on Facebook and Twitter!

July 30, 2015

Why We Need Our Elders to Take the U.S. Trans Survey

Pony Knowles, SAGE Center Midtown Program Coordinator
Pony Knowles, SAGE Center Midtown Program Coordinator

I was one of perhaps three trans people at the small liberal arts college I attended. One stayed stealth throughout all four years, and the other chose not to transition medically. I was out. Very out. You can well imagine the kinds of questions I found myself asked by my fellow cisgender classmates. Aside from all of the more terrifying or rewarding aspects of being visibly trans—and those are, for many of us, manifold—the most tiresome is the bombardment of inappropriate questions from well-intentioned cis people. Worse yet, there is a temptation to translate the responses they hear from any one trans person into a kind of 'official' trans narrative, applicable to all trans people, of all walks of life.

Back on that college campus, the answers I gave varied from day to day, depending upon my exhaustion at serving as a public fount of knowledge, especially when I myself was still discovering my community and my place in it. Suffice it to say, my answers, I’m sure, differed significantly from the hypothetical responses I can imagine my fellow trans classmates issuing—and those would likely differ greatly from each other as well. I couldn't speak for other trans people then. I can't speak for them now, but I remember them always. In the decades since, I have found myself thinking often of a woman who knew that she must remain stealth in order to get her education, particularly as an older nontraditional student. And I think of a young transmasculine student of mixed race and from a rural town in Georgia, who was not closeted and who was asked different questions than I was. And then there's me– a white, college-educated, middle-aged trans guy, who lives in a bustling metropolis– the questions that I am asked and the answers that I can give must not define an entire nation full of trans experiences, trans joys, and trans dangers.

The temptation to designate exemplars who appease the most normative standards of what trans can look like weighs heavy upon those of us who meet with the double bind of being marginalized within our own communities. Silence too often is meted out to those who are transgender and older, or not white, or poor, or geographically isolated. Particularly as the trans rights movement gains momentum and begins to focus itself upon the political goal that will unite and define us in the eyes of the nation, all voices must be raised and counted, safely, and with great compassion and intention. If we focus solely on our trans youth who are bullied in schools, who commit suicide, who don't have enough trans role models to support them— we must not risk losing sight of all of our trans foremothers and forefathers who have already spent their entire lives in the shadows of the LGBT community.

“We as older trans people need to engage and to educate younger generations of our experiences decades ago. As someone who transitioned in the 1970s, we had fewer resources, but we more readily made lemonade out of lemons.  Transitioning as an older adult means having a tougher battle than younger trans people. We need to address the issues we face, and we need to be visible, to show how we can also find happiness—whether one achieves ‘the surgery’ or not.”
                                                   -Frances, SAGE Constituent

The diversity of lived experience is striking when you speak to a trans youth in their teens or 20s, and to an older trans adult and their 60s or beyond. The dangers faced are very different, and the social realities are remarkably disparate. Transition dates also change everything: an older adult transitioning today will meet with a different set of challenges than someone of the exact same age who transitioned decades prior. That said, it is almost always the case that those of us who transition at any time and at any age need, more than anything else, to find ourselves in a legacy of support created by other transgender trailblazers, who light our path of discovery at every turn. Our genders are never created or sustained in isolation, and we owe our deepest debts of gratitude to those who have come before us. Too often do we overlook older voices, and too often are older members of our community less likely to step forward and make themselves vulnerable.

The wealth of narratives available to trans people about our history and our present remains enormously restricted— on one hand, by a simple lack of unified knowledge and, on the other, by a lack of access to the voices that must strain most to be heard. This is why the National Center for Transgender Equality has put together the 2015 U.S. Trans Survey, a follow-up to the National Transgender Discrimination Survey that was completed by nearly 6,500 people across the United States. It is imperative that this survey, conceived as a broad effort to outline information about the lives and experiences of trans, genderqueer, and nonbinary identified people, reach as far as possible into the most silenced pockets of our community. The fact that the survey can be completed anonymously, and that it is conducted by a trans-led organization, are the greatest guarantors that the information gathered by us will be used for us— to inform systems of support and advocacy, and to better the lives of trans people across the country.

Without a collection of pure data that seeks to weave together all of the constraints and desires and lived experiences of the trans community at large, we will continue to see a lack of services tailored to the needs of our communities. We will continue to see trans voices coming from the most diverse regions of our communities pushed out again and again. If, as they say, knowing is half the battle, then let us engage. 

SAGE Center Midtown will host a Trans Coffeehouse Social on Saturday, Sept. 12th, from 2-5 pm. The Cyber Center will be open to anyone who wants to complete the survey. Volunteers and staff will be on hand to assist; the space is accessible and designated for trans-identified members participants and guests all day. Please call (646) 576-8669 for more information.


--Posted by Pony Knowles, SAGE Center Midtown Program Coordinator

June 4, 2015

Heroes of Pride: Katherine Palmer

Every summer, LGBT people across the country step out during Pride season to honor who we are, celebrate the progress we’ve made, and re-energize ourselves for the battles ahead. Yet in the midst of all the revelry and marching, older people are often overlooked. This summer, SAGE is celebrating some lesser-known “Heroes of Pride” on our blog. 

The wide-open landscape of the southwest is home to today's hero, Katherine Palmer, a determined, energetic 73-year-old trans woman. As an LGBT activist for over 15 years, Katherine wastes no time. She's served as Board President of the Gender Identity Center of Colorado, Co-President of GenderPAC and Board President of PFLAG in her home town of Albuquerque, New Mexico--among many other roles. She has also lobbied for LGBT rights at both the national and state level. Perhaps most importantly for our purposes, Katherine is primarily responsible for bringing SAGE to Albuquerque, and currently serves as its Program Manager. 

KatherineThanks for talking with me, Katherine! Can you start us off with a bit of your personal story?

Well, I transitioned at age 58, in 1998.  I knew [I was trans] when I was young, hid it, and was later divorced because of it. When I retired from my career at IBM, I planned to work with Native Americans, but I decided to work with trans people instead.

Why did you decide to switch gears?

Well there was never really a term ‘transgender’ until about 1998, so I thought was only one in world. Then I went to the Gender Identity Center [GIC] and realized I wasn’t! So I got involved in that and jumped in full speed.

I wanted to reinforce that this wasn’t something to be ashamed of. I said "there’s nothing wrong with me, if you have a problem that’s your problem'. I got involved with the GIC and realized we were a minority that needed our voices heard. So I said ‘ok let’s go do it!’ I went to Washington DC and lobbied congress for ENDA.

You must’ve been so proud to do that!

Yes! I began to realize this was a national thing and I jumped in. I’m a strong believer in coalitions, I said, we can’t do this alone, we have to do this with others. I have also been very involved with PFLAG, which is wonderful because you have parents, family, friends and trans people, lesbians and gay men all in the same room!

What's so powerful about coalition building?

The thing that frustrates me within the LGBT community is that it's so localized.  I thought 'can’t we all work together?' and then I found SAGE and I said 'oooh! Here we go!'

Because everyone gets old! Aging is universal. 


How did you start a SAGE chapter?

I contacted SAGE national and put together a committee. Our biggest problem is that we don’t have a physical space. So we went to Albuquerque Senior Services, and said ‘we’d like to have an LGBT presence here’ and they said ‘sure’. Albuquerque is unique. We passed a non-discrimination law in '03. We came within one vote of same sex marriage about 5 years before we got it nationally. 

So is your message or your goal primarily about tolerance, or something more?

No, it’s something more. My goal with PFLAG and SAGE is to get to a point where we don’t need it, because we’re treated like everyone else. I go to a statewide aging conference every year on behalf of SAGE, and I’m trans and I’m not "stealth”, but no one gives me any hassles, I’m just Katherine. 

It sounds your experience since coming out has been pretty positive.


So you’re working on behalf of others who haven’t had it so easy is that right?

Yes, I see other people being abused or discriminated against and I just can't take that. I’m a firm believer that people are afraid of what they don’t understand. You teach, they learn, and the problem goes away. I'm not intimidated by them. My partner says, 'you go into the grocery store for a can of peas and these people are looking at you and you’re oblivious!' I have to remember sometimes that I’m trans.

What’s coming up for SAGE Albuquerque?

We have a golf tournament coming up in September. We’ve never done one out here, it’s a fundraiser for SAGE; we'll be offering prizes and awards. And then the aging conference is coming up this year, our topic will be LGBT older people and providers working together. We’re still growing and trying to find the LGBT seniors with strong support from the entire LGBTQ community.

So working with providers could really help you boost participation.

Yes! New Mexico is the 5th largest state in the country but we’re less than two million people in total, and half are in Albuquerque. Some people drive 30 miles to get to us. It’s not a very large group but it’s dedicated. Over the last 3 months, and our monthly meetings have all been new people—so something’s happening, the word’s getting out!

--Posted by Kira Garcia

May 18, 2015

Quick Chat: How to Be a Trans Ally

Our monthly “Quick Chats” with SAGE participants, volunteers and staff offers a first-person perspective on our community. This month, we spoke with Monica Pedone, a facilitator of our successful "How to Be a Trans Ally" workshop. The monthly gatherings are led by transgender facilitators who guide discussions, field questions, and build understanding among trans and cisgender (non-trans) participants.

Monica_PedoneAt age 62, Monica is a Cross Sector Technology Leader at IBM, a martial arts enthusiast and mother of two adult children. She transitioned at age 30, and says that before that “I was so deep in the closet I was finding Christmas presents! My divorce allowed me the freedom to find myself, and I began finding my people in the community.”

One of the topics discussed in the “Trans Ally” workshops is surgery and the idea that  questions about gender-affirming procedures (sometimes referred to as “sex change” operations) are usually inappropriate to ask  strangers about, especially since surgical and medical decisions are kept private by many trans people. At the same time, “Trans Ally” workshops are not intended to shame participants or discourage them from asking questions. In fact, Pedone says she’s enjoyed the lively conversations she’s experienced as a facilitator. “There were a lot of people there who were curious and inquisitive and have interesting points of view,” she remarks. “It was fun to interact and hear their perspective. I didn’t want to just be a talking head up there—it’s nice to have a dialogue.”

So how does one become a trans ally, exactly? Pedone has some wisdom to share. “I think that part of it certainly is learning the ‘ten things you don’t say to a transgender person’, but I’m not worried about people saying something as long as it’s coming from a place of learning rather than resentment or anger. You have to be a good person and say what’s in your heart. And if you make a mistake and call someone the wrong pronoun it’s OK, don’t make a big deal of it but next time try to do it right. Treat transgender people the same as everyone else, and also understand that there might be some gender cues that are slightly different.”

Pedone finds the approach of SAGE’s “Trans Ally” workshops to be especially impactful because “it allows trans people themselves to lead the conversation, and to meet and interact with people. Participants learn that trans people are just like them—they have mothers and pets and homes, they have trouble paying their bills. These workshops open the community up to new conversations, and new friendships. We shouldn’t box ourselves up into little groups.”

--Posted by Kira Garcia


March 16, 2015

A Response to "It's Never Too Late To Make a Change"

MadamsThis blog post was written by SAGE's Executive Director, Michael Adams, as a response to "It's Never Too Late To Make a Change," a New York Times article focusing on transgender aging. 

As “It’s Never Too Late To Make a Change,” New York Times, March 8, 2015, demonstrates, more and more transgender people are making the decision to embrace their gender identity later in life. As the New York Times points out, the pull to live your life as who you truly are runs deep at every stage of life. The stories shared by the Times are powerful profiles of grit, hope and liberation. The story not yet told is that, just as society plays a huge role in making the lives of transgender elders more difficult, there is tremendous opportunity and need to reform social policies so they stop discriminating against older people who are trans and start honoring and supporting them for who they are.

TransagingAs a major policy report issued in 2012 by Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE) and the National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE) documents, transgender older people face profound challenges and experience striking disparities in health care needs and access, employment, housing and much more. Improving The Lives of Transgender Older Adults, explains how transgender older people frequently encounter a health care system and national aging network that are ill-prepared to provide culturally competent care and services that affirm their gender identities and expressions.

Improving the Lives of Transgender Older Adults doesn't just settle on describing the problems.  Through 60 specific recommendations, the report provides a concrete and specific roadmap to policymakers and practitioners in the public and private sectors – highlighting what changes can and must be made.  The recommendations include steps to make services in the publicly-funded aging network more trans-inclusive, ways to improve health care, steps to end violence and abuse, strategies for equal opportunity in employment and housing, and steps to improve economic security among transgender older people.  

Fortunately, we are starting to make some progress.  For example, as the New York Times article points out, SAGE is providing support groups for older transgender people.  And some progress is being made at the state and federal level on vitally important issues like insurance coverage and identity documents.  But much more remains to be done to implement the SAGE/NCTE blueprint and give transgender older people the equity and support they deserve. 

Let’s hope that the powerful spotlight that the New York Times has shined on transgender pioneers stepping out in the third chapter of their lives will inspire policymakers and practitioners to play their part to make this world a welcoming one for people of all gender identities and ages.  The SAGE/NCTE report makes it clear that we know what needs to be done.  Let’s get on with the business of doing it.


November 20, 2014

Remembering our Transgender Brothers and Sisters

Today is the Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR), a solemn day where we pause to gather together and remember transgender people whose lives were ended by acts of violence over the past year. TDOR began when activist Gwendolyn Ann Smith organized a vigil to mark the death of Rita Hester, an African-American transgender woman who was murdered in 1998.

This afternoon and evening, all over the United States and internationally, communities will gather together to honor the lives of those we have lost, while also drawing attention to the systemic violence faced by the transgender community. While each vigil is slightly different, all TDOR events involve reading the names of every transgender person killed over the last year. This year we also mark the loss of Leslie Feinberg, a transgender activist and author of Stone Butch Blues. Feinberg’s life was ended by illness and not violence, but her work to end oppression and support everyone’s right to self-determination continues to resonate beyond the transgender and LGBT communities, and into our society at large.

These events provide an opportunity to come together as a community and ensure not only that those we have lost will not be forgotten, but that their deaths will not be in vain. They are an important chance to look forward to what can be done to end violence against the transgender community. Click here to find a TDOR event near you.

November 6, 2014

People at Out & Equal are talking about Out & Visible!

People are talking about Out & Visible! Our new study of the fears, beliefs, behaviors and aspirations of LGBT older adults offers important--and startling--statistics that have long been missing from our conversations about LGBT aging. At the Out & Equal conference in San Francisco yesterday, a panel of representatives from major financial and consumer companies weighed in on how the report can help them better serve our communities. We're excited to share the findings of this study with new audiences across the country, and to hear their responses.


For example, Out & Visible found that LGBT older people are far more concerned than non-LGBT older people about their financial security and retirement. 42% of LGBT older people are very or extremely concerned that they'll outlive their retirement savings, as compared to 25% of non-LGBT people.  A panelist from Prudential, Josh Stoffregen, remarked that "Being able to better understand the unique needs and challenges the older LGBT population is facing helps us as we continue to learn more about all aspects of our community.  We're pleased that SAGE is shedding light on this important topic."

Despite our years of recent progress, LGBT people still struggle with disproportionate barriers to health and happiness. Out & Visible provides many insights which reveal the extent of these issues and the work that's still necessary to create longer, healthier lives for LGBT older adults.

--Posted by Kira Garcia