28 posts categorized "SAGE Story"

March 12, 2015

"I love being myself, but society didn't."

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SAGE Story is our national digital storytelling program for LGBT older adults that focuses on storytelling as a way to diversify the public narratives on aging, long-term care and LGBT rights. Through the generous support of the Evelyn and Walter Haas Jr. Fund, SAGE Story programs were established at SAGE sites in North Carolina and Pennsylvania to build their capacities as LGBT aging advocates and to collect stories on the ways in which discrimination has affected LGBT older people. To highlight this exciting initiative, we will be featuring a special SAGE Story on this blog throughout February and March. In addition, be sure to watch all of the amazing stories that our LGBT pioneers share with us on our specific page dealing with discrimination.

This week, we are highlighting Timothy's Story. Timothy comes to us from our partners at The Freedom Center for Social Justice in Charlotte, NC. 

Based in Charlotte, NC, the Freedom Center for Social Justice is a social justice non-profit organization working at the intersections of race, class, faith, social justice, sexual orientation and gender identity.  In Timothy's video, he talks about how difficult it was growing up in a society that was anti-gay and how he eventually overcame a drug addiction. "I love being myself, but society didn't. That's why I chose drugs." Watch his story below or on our SAGE Story site.

March 5, 2015

“I am not anywhere near as out as I used to be”

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SAGE Story is our national digital storytelling program for LGBT older adults that focuses on storytelling as a way to diversify the public narratives on aging, long-term care and LGBT rights. Through the generous support of the Evelyn and Walter Haas Jr. Fund, SAGE Story programs were established at SAGE sites in North Carolina and Pennsylvania to build their capacities as LGBT aging advocates and to collect stories on the ways in which discrimination has affected LGBT older people. To highlight this exciting initiative, we will be featuring a special SAGE Story on this blog once a week for the next three weeks. In addition, be sure to watch all of the amazing stories that our LGBT pioneers share with us on our specific page dealing with discrimination.

This week, we are highlighting Jeanne's Story. Jeanne comes to us from SAGE Wilmington of the Cape Fear Coast. She talks about how different it is living in North Carolina compared to her former home in Connecticut. As she states, "I have learned to be very circumspect about my personal life at work. I just don't talk about it." Watch her story below or on our SAGE Story site.

February 26, 2015

"I Began to Realize the Possible Consequences of Being Outed"

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SAGE Story is our national digital storytelling program for LGBT older adults that focuses on storytelling as a way to diversify the public narratives on aging, long-term care and LGBT rights. Through the generous support of the Evelyn and Walter Haas Jr. Fund, SAGE Story programs were established at SAGE sites in North Carolina and Pennsylvania to build their capacities as LGBT aging advocates and to collect stories on the ways in which discrimination has affected LGBT older people. To highlight this exciting initiative, we will be featuring a special SAGE Story on this blog once a week for the next three weeks. In addition, be sure to watch all of the amazing stories that our LGBT pioneers share with us on our specific page dealing with discrimination.

This week, we are highlighting Dave's Story. Dave comes to us from the Western Pennsylvania SAGE at the Persad Center. He had a career in education where he feared that being outed could jeopardize his job. The acceptance and support of friends, family and his church gave him comfort. Watch his story below or on our SAGE Story site.

 

February 19, 2015

SAGE Story: Talking About Discrimination

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SAGE Story is our national digital storytelling program for LGBT older adults that focuses on storytelling as a way to diversify the public narratives on aging, long-term care and LGBT rights. Through the generous support of the Evelyn and Walter Haas Jr. Fund, SAGE Story programs were established at SAGE sites in North Carolina and Pennsylvania to build their capacities as LGBT aging advocates and to collect stories on the ways in which discrimination has affected LGBT older people. To highlight this exciting initiative, we will be featuring a special SAGE Story on this blog once a week for the next four weeks. In addition, be sure to watch all of the amazing stories that our LGBT pioneers share with us on our specific page dealing with discrimination.

This week, we are putting the spotlight on Chrissie, a 64-year old lesbian, who worked for nearly 35 for a global accounting firm. It was only in the final 6 years at her job that she found a more welcoming environment after workplace policies and support systems were improved. Chrissie comes to us from the Western Pennsylvania SAGE at Persad Center.

October 2, 2014

First Comes Love

Storytelling is an integral part of SAGE's national work and we use our SAGE Story program to strengthen the storytelling skills—and draw on the unique life experiences of—LGBT older adults to diversify the public narratives on aging, long-term care and LGBT rights. One storyline that continues to resonate in our community is that of love, committment and, sometimes, marriage.

In honor of celebrating these relationships, SAGE is excited for the release of First Comes Love: Portraits of Enduring LGBTQ Relationships from photographer Barbara Proud. This book highlights photos and love stories of 65 long-term same-sex couples, together from 10 to 59 years. Watch the trailer below for a few of these couples' amazing stories and feel free to share your own with SAGE

First Comes Love from B. Proud on Vimeo.

September 12, 2014

Moving Non-discrimination Protections through Storytelling

SAGE Story is a national digital storytelling program for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) elders. The initiative brings together sites in North Carolina and Pennsylvania to build their capacities as LGBT aging advocates and to collect stories on the ways in which discrimination has affected LGBT older people.

This collaboration is designed to capture the critical voice of LGBT elders on LGBT equality advocacy struggles—from efforts to pass state and local nondiscrimination laws, to policy initiatives for relationship recognition, to campaigns to encourage pro-equality public opinion.

To prepare them to lead this work, our LGBT aging advocates will receive a custom training in non-discrimination messaging and framing from Jace Woodrum, Director of Communications for the Gill Foundation and Roey Thorpe, Director of Advocacy Programs for the Equality Federation. The training is based on new research, conducted by the Equality Federation and the Movement Advancement Project.

Recently, SAGE's Serena Worthington, Director of National Field Initiatives, spoke with Jace Woodrum to learn more.  

Jace-Woodrum-Headshot-for-BlogCan you tell me a bit about the research process?

When we do polling around non-discrimination laws both in local communities, state-wide and at the national level, we see high levels of support, oftentimes in the 70th and 80th percentile, but when we get into the midst of a campaign around non-discrimination—our opponents use some very hurtful scare tactics to stir up concerns in the public which can make it tough to keep the support that we start with. Our research is focused on understanding the real concerns people have and developing messaging that helps people navigate those concerns and remain supportive.

How was the research conducted?

The process began with one-on-one interviews with LGBT people to understand their experiences of discrimination. Then, we went into some exploratory focus groups to learn about how people think about non-discrimination laws. Over the course of the project, we honed in on trans issues, and we also looked separately at employment non-discrimination and housing and public accommodations. We have done dozens and dozens of focus groups, polls, and some online surveys as well.

Why is this project important?

We know that we are making, as a movement, huge advances on marriage, but our progress on non-discrimination has stalled at the state-wide level. Advancing non-discrimination laws and ensuring basic legal protections for LGBT people is critical because even as we’re winning marriage, our community still faces discrimination, especially transgender people who are especially vulnerable to unfair treatment at work and in our communities. Once we secure the freedom to marry nationwide, it’s only going to get more complicated. For example, we are seeing this play out right now in Pennsylvania, a state that has marriage equality but doesn’t have critical non-discrimination protections.

What are some key ways that framing and messaging have changed based on research?

For years, we talked about marriage as a set of rights and benefits that same-sex couples wanted to access. Then, through research, we learned that our way of talking about marriage as a set of critical rights was not building support among the public and was not accurately depicting why same-sex couples wanted to marry: for love and commitment. So we shifted our messaging, and we’ve seen huge gains in public opinion and in the number of states allowing same-sex couples to share in the freedom to marry. We’ve had similar breakthroughs from this non-discrimination research project, and we’re learning more and more everyday.

SAGE Story is funded by the Evelyn and Walter Haas Jr. Fund

North Carolina Sites

SAGE Raleigh at the LGBT Community Center of Raleigh
SAGE Wilmington of the Cape Fear Coast
The Freedom Center for Social Justice


Pennsylvania Sites
SAGE Western Pennsylvania at Persad Center
SAGE Philadelphia at William Way LGBT Community Center

--Posted by Serena Worthington, Director of National Field Initiatives. Follow her at @SerenaWorthy

February 11, 2014

Four Amazing Women of Color Share Their Stories

In honor of February being African American History Month, SAGE will be highlighting our diverse programs, constituents and stories relevant to black aging. Check back for featured stories every Tuesday, with additional posts throughout the month.

Our stories connect us and allow us to share common bonds through the use of words, pictures, music and video. Today, we would like to share stories from four African American women from around the country. Each of their voices and stories are different, but all share the desire for recognition and hope for the future. If you have a story to share, please tell us by visiting our SAGE Story portal on the SAGE website.

Cheryl & Elizabeth, SAGE Wilmington of the Cape Fear Coast, North Carolina
The two tell us about how despite growing up in faith-based traditions that did not affirm their being lesbians, they somehow met at church. They explain how their faith joined them together and how 10 years later, they are still together and still in church and are accepted in their community!


FrancesFrances, SAGE Harlem, New York City
Frances, 72, is a lover of Zumba and food! She shares her experience of having a stroke and how her lover of 20 years was so supportive and caring of her in the hospital. She wants women to know that they have the power and strength to get better after a debilitating situation such as herself. Listen to her story, recorded in 2013 for SAGE Story, below.

 


Helena Bushong2Helena, SAGE Center on Halsted, Chicago
Helena, a transgender older adult diagnosed with HIV, shares her powerful story in a wonderful essay. She writes, "the most important thing I learned in accepting myself as transgender and also living with HIV/AIDS was about stigma.  I realized that my fear of disclosing my HIV/AIDS status was extremely unhealthy and only contributed to my loneliness and isolation, and would cause me to indeed die faster." Read an excerpt below and the whole story here.

My name is Helena and I am a 60-year-old transgender female living with HIV. I am not a victim. An HIV/AIDS diagnosis is NOT a death sentence, but is similar to living with breast cancer or diabetes, which through some lifestyle changes, are manageable diseases.

I was diagnosed with HIV and AIDS in 2002, and was told I would not live more than six months, and at best, a year. Along with my doctors, I believe that I was a "late tester," meaning because I was diagnosed with AIDS—a late stage infection—and not HIV, I likely contracted HIV 15 to 20 years before showing any sign or symptoms. Because people can carry HIV/AIDS asymptomatically, it is important to be tested on a regular basis to avoid a late test and spreading the disease.

Read her whole story here.

November 27, 2013

Giving Thanks a Little Early

Coming up on Thanksgiving, we wanted to share a story from one of our fantastic Case Managers, Larry Gile.  Larry currently has about forty-five clients that he works with on a regular basis and we share one of his stories below. We also wanted to share with you a note we got from Nancy on our website. We are thankful for our staff, board, clients, LGBT older adults and all who look to SAGE for help. Happy Thanksgiving!

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SAGE Case Manager, Larry Gile

We try to have all of our clients have a happy results--of course, that isn't always the case. However, the story I have to tell has a good ending, one that I think is perfect for the holiday season. Our clients' names have been changed for their confidentiality.

Stan is an 87-year old native of Maryland who has led a life of entertainment. He was a singer, musician, the author of numerous children's books and a worked on an Oscar-award winning film (in an age of IMDB, we'll keep the film name to ourselves). His caregiver and partner, Irwin, is originally from Alabama and worked in book publishing. Irwin is 75-years old.

About five years ago, Stan began showing symptoms of cognitive impairment, accompanied by increasing frailty and became a regular client of SAGE. We worked with both Stan and Irwin to arrange for God's Love We Deliver and home health aides in order to help them both. Recently, Stan experienced a series of falls in his home which made it clear to both to him and his partner that a long-term nursing home placement would be the safest and most logical next step in his life.

Nursing home placement can be difficult--especially when the financial situation is tight. SAGE's Case Manager, Larry Gile, helped Stan prepare and submit applications for five nursing homes as well as collecting the extensive personal and financial records needed to apply for nursing home Medicaid. Unfortunately, Larry didn't hear anything favorable from the homes for Stan. Deciding a visit was in order, Larry went to Stan's top choice in person to see if there was anything he could do to facilitate Stan's admission.

Larry introduced himself to the nursing home's brand new Director of Admitting and told him Stan's story and circumstances. The Director took an interest in Stan's case after hearing about his hardships in person and several days later, SAGE received notice that a bed was available for Stan!

Stan moved in a week later and was comfortable in his new situation. Miraculously, two weeks later, he was moved into a private room! This allows him more privacy and a chance to make the room his actual home. He is now flourishing in his new home and getting the care he needs. His partner Irwin is able to better take care of himself as the needs of his partner are being met. Larry is still in contact with the couple and reports that both are doing great!

A Note From Nancy

3791122SAGE received this email from our website feedback form and wanted to share this with our community. We are proud to be serving people like Nancy, who may not have access to the local services we provide in New York and those our affiliates provide around the country.

I am very grateful for this site because, living in a senior community made up of a majority of very conservative residents, it is one place I can visit to feel connected to my "larger community" and LGBT activities. I made clear to the administration here, before moving in nearly 3 years ago, that I am Lesbian. I was assured that I was fully accepted. I neither flaunt or hide my identity but have not found but one, straight, resident to whom I can confide. It gets lonely sometimes. Fortunately, my Episcopal church is is very open and accepting...my home away from home! Thank you for all the stories and features on this site which so enrich my and the lives of many others!

November 25, 2013

Winner Chosen in the First-Ever SAGE Story Contest!

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You came. You read. You voted. 

Many thanks to all who participated in our SAGE Story contest—both in sharing their story and voting! We are pleased to announce that Kimberly Burnham, PhD is our winner! Kimberly, is a 56-year-old lesbian who bicycled 3000+ miles across America on the 2013 Hazon Cross USA. She wrote a poem about her experience that resonated with our voters and won a $50 Amazon giftcard and bragging rights for winning our first-ever national contest!

Read her poem below or check it out the full SAGE Story site with all of our finalists and more stories. Inspired? Share your story! We would love to hear from you.

Continue reading "Winner Chosen in the First-Ever SAGE Story Contest!" »

November 21, 2013

SAGE Story Contest: Voting Ends Tomorrow!

Fb2We are so proud to have received numerous stories for our SAGE Story Contest! We asked the question: "What does 'community' mean to you? How do you stay connected to the people who matter most to you?" and got inspiring responses. Four of our finalists are now up on our site and we need your help deciding the winner.

Our four finalists share tales of strength, resilience, love, friendship and caregiving. We are honored that they chose to tell their stories to the world.

Visit our voting page, check out the four stories and pick your favorite! You have until tomorrow, Friday, November 22, 5 pm EST to decide. Contest results will be up on Monday, so be sure to check back!