25 posts categorized "Healthcare"

March 12, 2014

Celebrating Women's History Month

IMG_1123SAGE's strong women's community has led to many women-centric programming throughout the organization. The arrival of Felicia Sobel, LCSW, as our Women's Programming Coordinator in 2011 solidified our committement to providing quality events and programs to reflect the breadth of interests of LBT women. Too often, aging is equated with decline and diminishing strengths. On the contrary, growing older means reaching a life stage where friendships deepen, values intensify, goals (old and new) crystallize, wisdom emerges and interests often flourish.

IMG_1692This month, in honor of Women's History Month, we are highlighting all of our women's programs and events. Feel free to stop by The SAGE Center or SAGE Harlem to take part in one of our many women's groups, or attend one of our upcoming dances or lectures!

Special Events:

SAGE & Henrietta Hudson St. Patrick's Tea Dance
March 16, 2014
3:00 - 9:00 pm at Henrietta Hudson, 438 Hudson Street, NYC
Celebrate and dance the day away at a special St. Paddy's Day Tea Dance at the legendary Henrietta Hudson! $10 at the door and all proceeds go to SAGE!

Celebrate Women's History Month with SAGE
March 21, 2014
7:00 - 8:30 pm at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, NYC
Hear published women writers read from their work and join us for a Q & A session.  This stimulating event will feature readings by novelist Kathleen Collins; author-publisher Jan Freeman; playwright Barbara Kahn; writer Jaye McNeil; and poet Chocolate Waters. Contributions appreciated, but not necessary and all are welcome!

The Best Women's Dance in NYC: Spring Edition
May 4, 2014
3:30 - 8:30 pm at Club LQ, 511 Lexington Ave, NYC
The Best Women's Dance in NYC is back in May after a successful winter dance in January! Celebrate with friends, old and new, and join us for our triannual tradition! $20 in advance/$25 at the door - get your tickets here!

Special Programs:

Ask the Docs For Women: Workshop on Women's Health
March 24, 2014
3:00 - 4:30 PM at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, NYC
The SAGE Center has partnered with Beth Israel Medical Center to provide a monthly series addressing health concerns that LGBT older adults face.  Join us this month for a workshop specifically geared towards women’s health.

SHE (Strong. Healthy. Energized) Fitness Program
April 2, 2014 - June 18, 2014
2:00 - 3:00 pm at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, NYC
SAGE has announced its second offering of the SHE (Strong. Healthy. Energized) FREE fitness program, which is a holistic series of 12 sessions that include exercises, nutritional and cooking information as well as discussions. The goal is to help participants (overweight lesbians and bisexual women over 60) approach fitness and weight issues in a comfortable, fun atmosphere.  RSVP to Felicia: fsobel@sageusa.org or call her at 212-741-2247.

Ongoing Programs/Groups:

Women: Our Evolving Lives with Felicia
Weekly on Tuesdays
6:00 - 7:30 pm at SAGE, 305 7th Avenue, 6th Floor, Conference Room 1, NYC
Women-only discussion group for those who wish to talk in a welcoming and open environment.  Please contact Felicia for more information.

Women's Support Group
Weekly on Wednesdays
3:30 - 5:30 pm at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, NYC
A welcoming support group for women who need to need to talk or listen in a comfortable and supportive atmosphere. Experience the empowerment of this peer-led group.

Women's Group: Relationships with Felicia
Weekly on Thursdays
3:30 - 5:30 pm at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, NYC
This free group requires pre-registration. Contact Felicia for more information and to register. This women-led group is a safe place to talk about relationships and whatever else is going on in life. 

Trans Women's Group
2nd Thursday of the Month
6:30 - 8:30 pm at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, NYC
A recent discussion group faciliated by Jackie and Asia. Open to all transgender women who would like to talk about life and issues in a supportive and welcoming environment.

SAGE Harlem Women's 40+ Support Group
1st Friday of the month
6:00 - 8:00 pm at SAGE Harlem, 2090 Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Blvd., Suite 201, NYC
Support Group by and for lesbian and bisexual 40+ women.  Refreshments served and new-comers welcome.  Come meet friends and SAGE staff in a supportive and welcoming atmosphere.

March 6, 2014

LGBT Health Month is Here

1003088Did you know that March is New York's LGBT Health Month (in addition to Women's History Month, of course)?

This year's theme is "Access to Care" -- focusing on increased health services for LGBT New Yorkers, including the options under the Affordable Care Act. Since LGBT older adults deal with significant health disparities across areas related to physical and mental health, including high blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease, HIV/AIDS and more, "Access to Care" is even more important for our population.

Throughout the month, we will be highlighting a variety of SAGE programs, fact sheets and reports related to the health and wellbeing of our LGBT older adults. To kick things off, we're including a list of all SAGE programs featured in the NYS LGBT Health Awareness Month Calendar and don't forget our special page for information on the Affordable Care Act.

The programs below are offered at The SAGE Center at 305 Seventh Avenue on the 15th floor and are for LGBT adults age 60 and over. 

  • Dealing with Stress: Saturdays from 3-4:30 - Psychotherapist-led open support group
  • Health as a Memoir: Wednesday, March 12, 3 – 4:30 pm- Workshop from Say Ah! that works with you to construct your  personal health history and thereby better help you maintain your health
  • Ask The Docs – Workshop on Women’s Health: Monday, March 24,  3-4:30 pm – Our monthly series with specialists from Beth Israel, focusing in March month on women’s health issues in honor of Women’s History month
  • S.H.E. (Strong. Healthy. Energized): Wednesday, March 5, 2-3 pm – An informational session our 12 week fitness program for lesbian and bisexual women to be launched in April
  • Max, the Therapy Dog: Mondays  3/3, 3/10, 3/24 & 3/31 at 6:30 pm  
  • Meditation: Tuesdays, 4-4:45 pm – With Dojun
  • Gentle Yoga: Tuesdays, 6:15-7 pm
  • Tai Chi: Wednesdays, 3:30-4:30 – With Doc Woodbine
  • Blood Pressure Clinic: Thursdays, 3:30-4 pm – Get your blood pressure checked with Nurse Mary
  • Movement Workshop: Tuesdays, 3:30-4:30 pm – With Billy
  • Medicare Minute: Wednesday, March 12th at 4:30 – Part D Appeals
  • Ask the Pharmacist: Tuesday, March 18, 4-4:45 pm – Marina, pharmacist from Walgreen’s, talks about foot care
  • MS Support Group: Mondays at 6:30 pm – Drop-in for all ages, facilitated by MS Society

Additionally, our SAGE Harlem location at 2090 Seventh Ave. @ 125th Street, Suite 201 offers:

  • New Beginnings HIV Support Group: Tuesdays, 2-3:30 pm – drop in for MSM’s age 40 and over
  • Sexuality & Spirituality Discussions : Mondays, 3/10 & 3/24, 2:30-4 pm with Program Coordinator Chris Jones
  • Grief Group: Saturdays, 3/3  & 3/15 – Support group for older adults (50+) dealing with grief & loss

The SAGE Center Brooklyn, at 30 Third Avenue in the YWCA, 2nd floor offers:

  • Gentle Yoga: Thursdays, 1-2 pm (except no class 3/20) – With Ria Cooper
January 23, 2014

LGBT Advocates Disappointed Rules for Community Care Fail to Protect LGBT Older Adults

The undersigned LGBT organizations are deeply disappointed that the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced it will not add explicit nondiscrimination protections for LGBT and other consumers to Medicaid’s Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) program. Our organizations along with the National Senior Citizens Law Center, have urged HHS over the past three years to adopt these protections to ensure low-income older adults and people with disabilities can receive needed services and supports without fear of refusal, harassment, or other discrimination because of who they are. The protections were not included in a final rule issued on Thursday to strengthen standards for the long-running program.

HHS seemingly based its decision to reject these LGBT protections, which have been included in other HHS programs, on the notion that general nondiscrimination protections already exist. Despite being made aware of the critical need for explicit LGBT consumer protections, as well as protections on the basis of religion, marital status, and source of payment, HHS simply stated in a new HCBS regulation that these protections were "not necessary."

HHS's surprising statement that protections for LGBT older adults are "not necessary" is contradicted by reports from the Institute of Medicine and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, which have found that discrimination against LGBT people in health settings is widespread. A survey of providers, LGBT consumers, and family members conducted with the National Senior Citizens Law Center found that most believed anti-LGBT discrimination was a problem in long-term care settings and many had witnessed discrimination. Failure to include explicit protections undermines efforts prevent anti-LGBT discrimination in home- and community-based care.

We call on HHS to take immediate action to ensure the health and safety of LGBT older adults and people with disabilities by addressing discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity in amended rule or guidance. We also strongly urge HHS to take action to address anti-LGBT discrimination in other health care settings, particularly hospitals and nursing homes. While we urge LGBT consumers who face discrimination in any health setting, including home- and community-based services, to file complaints with HHS on the ground of sex discrimination, explicit LGBT protections are needed to prevent mistreatment and denials of care.

  • Human Rights Campaign
  • FORGE
  • Lambda Legal
  • National Center for Transgender Equality
  • National Gay and Lesbian Task Force
  • Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE)
December 17, 2013

Be Out2Enroll by December 23

This blog post is from Out2Enroll. Out2Enroll is an organization devoted to helping all LGBT people find the answers they need to enroll in the Health Insurance Marketplace. For details specific to LGBT older adults, please visit the SAGE Affordable Care Act site here.

OuttoenrollHappy holidays! This year, we’re celebrating more than family, friends, food, and exciting progress in the fight for marriage equality. Why? Because December is also about health. Your health. Your family’s health. Your friends’ health. Our community’s health.

Why? For too long, health care has failed to meet the needs of many in the LGBT community. It has failed to provide coverage when we needed it most, failed to recognize our families, and failed to protect us from financial ruin.

Our community deserves better. Which is why we are excited for the new affordable options that are now available thanks to health reform!

For the first time for many, financial assistance is available to help you afford low- or no-cost health insurance and you may be able to apply jointly with your same-sex partner. Plus, the new marketplaces and coverage cannot discriminate against LGBT people. You can expect the same access to services that non-LGBT people receive and you can no longer be denied coverage or charged more simply for being yourself. And these are just a few of the new benefits.

Why the holidays? Because December – specifically, December 23 – is the date you need to enroll in health insurance to make sure you have coverage on January 1, 2014. You can still sign up next year but it’s important to start the new year off healthy – and covered!

Still have questions? No problem. There are great LGBT-specific resources at www.out2enroll.org, which has answers to your most burning LGBT questions, an awesome video from Jason Collins, and a blog with stories of people like you who were able to get health insurance that fits their needs and their budget.

This holiday season, make sure you check out www.out2enroll.org and connect with www.healthcare.gov to explore your new coverage options today by December 23!

November 18, 2013

The Unmeasured LGBT Life

Today’s post is from Robert Espinoza, Senior Director for Public Policy and Communications at SAGE. It was originally featured on The Huffington Post.

1robertI spent the summer of 2012 homebound, recovering alone in my 400-square-foot studio apartment in Brooklyn. A serious accident on Memorial Day led to ankle surgery, 12 weeks on crutches and the final stretch of August re-learning to walk. When you live alone and are relatively immobile, the days are epic, and the psyche churns with questions: Would I fully regain my ability to walk? Had I amassed the proper support network of friends at this stage in my adult life? And if I remained in New York City, a city fraught with opportunities yet rife with inequality, how should I plan for my aging as a queer person?

It was fitting, then, that I began working that summer on policy guidance to compel the New York State Department of Health to include LGBT-specific questions in its statewide patient assessment system for specific Medicaid-funded providers—a policy win announced this week. As I interviewed researchers and health leaders from around the country to grasp the implications, and as I schooled myself on the state of LGBT data collection, I found myself growing lonelier by the week. I couldn’t help picturing my later years at the mercy of providers and researchers who are indifferent, or even hostile, to my queer life.

I work daily on the politics that underlie these issues, and I’ve arrived at this proposition: as we age, each of us will reach a moment where we’ll need to ask for support in dealing with the frailty incurred through aging. But if we’re lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), the type of institutional support we receive at that point will rely largely on the questions that have already been asked about us. If we’re denied these data to craft relevant health interventions, we will perish off-screen in droves, measured only by the shallowest of statistics. 

Continue reading "The Unmeasured LGBT Life" »

November 8, 2013

SAGE Speaks at Senate Committee Meeting on Aging

Adams_senate
SAGE Executive Director, Michael Adams, sits next to Joe Baker, President of the Medicare Rights Center at the November 6th Senate Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee.


On November 6, several leaders in the aging field met with the Senate Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee to discuss programs that are critical to the health and economic security of older Americans. SAGE Executive Director Michael Adams, one of the speakers at this meeting, highlighted the unique needs of LGBT older people and how federal programs can support healthy aging for all elders.

The Senate Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee is dedicated to fostering dialogue between Senate Democrats and leaders from across the nation. Each year, the Steering Committee hosts numerous meetings with advocates, policy experts, and elected officials to discuss key priorities The Steering Committee is chaired by Senator Mark Begich (D-AK) and vice chaired by Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH). Fifteen senators participated in the November 6 meeting, including Harry Reid (D-NV), Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Tom Harkin (D-IA), Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and  Jeff Merkley (D-OR), lead sponsor of ENDA.

To read more about the meeting, visit the Senate Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee’s page. Photos from the event can be found here.

October 16, 2013

Open Letter to Health Reform Advocates: Pay Attention to Discrimination

This post, from Robert Espinoza, Senior Director for Public Policy and Communications at SAGE, was originally featured on The Huffington Post. Read the original post here and follow Robert on Twitter.

Usa_healthThe harms inflicted by discrimination reveal themselves in our bodies as we age -- as people of color, as poor and low-income people, and as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people. The symptoms manifest as higher rates of high blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease, HIV/AIDS, depression, social isolation and more. In medical charts throughout the country, our bodies record what it means to survive a life shaped by perpetual poverty, higher concentrations in low-wage jobs with no health insurance, thin retirement options and inadequate protections in the workplace. They depict our fractured relationships to health care -- from cultural and linguistic barriers to overt bias and discrimination from health and aging providers, to a long-held, hard-earned distrust of medical staff internalized through years of differential treatment.

Our bodies confirm vividly the geographic dimensions of structural inequality, which can predict long-term health as early as childhood, based largely on where a person is born. We inhale the poison of inequality throughout our lives, and it inflames in our later years as a dismal diagnosis, a medical crisis or a preventable death. Yes, severe illness will surprise many of us at some point in our lives, and death is indiscriminate, but as empirical fact,poor health affects certain demographics disproportionately at earlier and higher rates, often the same people with no health coverage to manage the repercussions.

Continue reading "Open Letter to Health Reform Advocates: Pay Attention to Discrimination" »

October 4, 2013

Resources for Navigating the Health Insurance Marketplaces

Hhsbadge

It’s day 4 of open enrollment in the Health Insurance Marketplaces, and by many accounts, interest in the Marketplaces is high. If you’re thinking about getting coverage, but aren’t sure what to do, SAGE’s Health Insurance Action Center is a good place to start. In addition, there are many resources online to help you navigate the application process, figure out what kind of paperwork you need, and help you choose the right plan for you—the most comprehensive of these sites is Healthcare.gov.*

Here are a few other resources that can help you understand the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and how the Marketplaces work. If you need health insurance, you can take your time to research all your options—the open enrollment period doesn’t end until March 31, 2014.

*If you visit Healthcare.gov, you may encounter a “wait page” because traffic to the site has been high. Please note that this is a hold page – it is not an error page.  Please be patient, wait on that page to ensure that the system works when you get in, and don’t reload your browser. 

October 1, 2013

Open Enrollment in the Health Insurance Marketplace Starts Now!

LGBTAmericans_ACAToday is the start of open enrollment in the Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) older people ages 50-64, who tend to report lower rates of health insurance coverage, stand to benefit greatly from the Marketplace.

Without insurance, many people delay care, which can exacerbate poor health. LGBT people across the age span deal with significant disparities in multiple areas related to physical and mental health, and an older person’s poor health represents the cumulative effect of a lifetime of discrimination. In addition, many LGBT older people have faced discrimination in health care settings or have been denied coverage because they were transgender or living with HIV/AIDS.  

However, the ACA prevents health insurers from denying coverage or charging higher premiums based on pre-existing conditions, or a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity. This is a significant step toward expanding health care access for transgender people and people living with HIV/AIDS. And new benefits for elders on Medicare improve access to preventive services and reduce prescription drug costs.

Are you uninsured, or underinsured? As a Champion for Coverage, SAGE wants you to get the health insurance you need. First, determine whether you should be shopping for health insurance in the Marketplace, or if you’re already covered by another program (i.e., Medicare):

  • For older people under age 65 and uninsured, the Marketplace provides a variety of insurance plans to make health care affordable for you and your family. The Marketplace Open Enrollment period is October 1, 2013 to March 31, 2014. Coverage can start as soon as January 1, 2014.
  • For people age 65+ and already on Medicare, the Marketplace does not affect you. However, between October 15 and December 7, 2013, you have the opportunity to review your current health and drug prescription coverage. Visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-Medicare for information on Medicare Open Enrollment.

If you’re ready to get coverage, enrollment is easy. Download SAGE’s ACA fact sheet to learn how to get started. While there is currently a government shutdown in effect, health coverage enrollment is not affected—so don’t delay signing up! In addition, SAGE’s new Health Insurance Action Center offers an FAQ that answers a number of concerns we’ve heard from LGBT older people about the plans being offered through the Marketplace, and other resources to help you choose the plan that’s best for you. Visit today, explore your options, and enroll!

September 27, 2013

Senate Special Committee on Aging Marks National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day

Aaron_taxIn recognition of National Gay Men's HIV Awareness Day, SAGE's Director of Federal Relations, Aaron Tax, gives his recap of SAGE's involvment in National HIV/AIDS & Aging Awareness Day in Washington, D.C.

On September 18, 2013, the Senate Special Committee on Aging—along with SAGE and our partners ACRIA, GMHC, HRC, and NHCOA—helped bring a series of events to Capitol Hill to mark National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day.  From a morning briefing, to a hearing in the afternoon, there were a number of strong and compelling voices who spoke of the challenges the aging network, medical field, and research community face with the graying of AIDS. 

At the briefing, Lisa Fitzpatrick, MD, Medical Director, Infectious Diseases Care Center, United Medical Center, spoke of the importance of making HIV testing as routine as testing for diabetes, high cholesterol, and other issues that disproportionately impact older adults; her view was echoed by other experts attending the briefing. Including HIV in the normal battery of tests would be an important step toward lessening the stigma surrounding HIV (and HIV testing), and it would increase the likelihood that individuals would be tested regardless of actual or perceived risk category.  (Currently, HIV testing is recommended for people only up to age 64.

Dr. Henry Pacheco, Director of Medicine and Public Health for NHCOA, added the voice of one of our Diverse Elders Coalition partners.  Dr. Pacheco explained that the HIV/AIDS rate for those Latinos who are 50-plus in the United States is five times higher than their non-Hispanic white counterparts.  He talked about how the population that NHCOA serves has not been reached or targeted in outreach efforts for a variety of reasons, including the usual misconception that older adults don’t use drugs and don’t have sex, but also, cultural, linguistic, and generational barriers.  These barriers can be overcome, he said, by efforts tailored to the Hispanic community, including the use of of “pase la voz,” word-of-mouth, to spread awareness, and “charlas,” informal educational sessions, specifically designed to reach Hispanic older adults.

1senateLater in the day, at the hearing, Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) challenged the administration on whether it is properly focusing its HIV resources on prevention, treatment, and research on older adults.  And Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) focused on the more human impacts of the HIV/AIDS crisis, recalling her days as a young public official in Wisconsin, when men, she said, became afflicted with AIDS in the big cities, but were coming home to Wisconsin to die, often at young ages. Given the fact that by 2015, half of the people who are HIV positive will be over 50, we’ve certainly made progress since that time.  The day’s briefing and hearing, however, showed there is still much to be done as we face new challenges brought on by the intersection of HIV and aging.

You can view the hearing at the Special Committee on Aging’s site. (Please scroll to the 22:00 minute mark, the start of the hearing.)


For more information on HIV & Aging, download this fact sheet, handed out at the briefing and hearing.