5 posts categorized "Disabilities"

May 4, 2016

SAGECare: Creating a More Welcoming Space for LGBT Elders

By Vera Lukacs

SAGE is proud to announce the launch of SAGECare-- a new training initiative for service providers led by a passionate and experienced team from SAGE. It offers cultural competency training to service providers who wish to join a more inclusive community for LGBT elders, as well as learn to welcome LGBT older adults with open arms.  

Lrp1552SAGECare goes above and beyond the usual method of diversity training. The program creates a space for service providers to expand, transform and elevate their understanding of the needs of LGBT elders. The training provided by SAGECare help staff and administrators learn how to comfortably engage with LGBT elders; how to become open minded and non-judgmental, and how to create LGBT-inclusive programming. Once a person completes the training online or in-person, your agency will be awarded a SAGECare credential.  

A SAGECare credential indicates that a provider has completed a training especially geared toward LGBT elders by SAGECare Leadership or Certified Trainers, using SAGE-certified curricula. Agencies that have earned a credential are listed on the SAGECare website and are able to use the SAGECare logo on advertising, websites and other platforms as specified by a Licensing Agreement. By presenting a SAGECare credential badge, you will demonstrate to your community that you have the background, skills, and knowledge to work with a diverse population. Please review these badges to ensure that a service provider is SAGECare credentialed:  

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So, why invest in LGBT competency? “Because your mission is to serve people with the best care possible. SAGECare helps you serve your LGBT and other diverse clients even better. When your staff and agency become LGBT competent, you can communicate with your clients, residents and their families with even more compassion and depth — what’s great for all community members is great for business.” said Hilary Meyer, SAGECare Director.  

Have more questions? No problem. Contact SAGECare here or check out SAGECare’s FAQ page. SAGECare has already trained over 10,000 providers, join them or find one today!  

Vera Lukacs is a digital media assistant at SAGE.

May 2, 2016

Reducing Stress Among LGBT Older Adults

This post originally appeared on Diverse Elders Coalition on April 26th, 2016. Read the original post here.

By Maria Glover Wallace

April is National Stress Awareness Month and there is no better time for seniors to relax and recoup! Our LGBT seniors may face daily stress regarding housing, healthcare, and finances. Thankfully, many can find comfort in community during regular interaction and engagement in programming provided by community organizations such as Affinity Community Services in Chicago, IL.  Affinity provides a safe and brave space for LGBT seniors participating in the monthly Trailblazers peer-led group.

The LGBT communities face high levels of discrimination and prejudice for who they are and who they love, beginning in youth and continuing through later years in life. Compounded with the stress of aging – issues of health, fitness, mental health, caregiving, economic security, and more – our elders may be experiencing a lot of stress. A study in 2011 from the University of Washington showed that older adults who identify as LGBT face higher rates of disabilities and physical and mental stress than their heterosexual peers.


Our LGBT seniors are a vital resource of strength and remembrance for the many strides of progress in our community. They should not suffer this undue burden. So, what are some ways that we can reduce this stress?

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 18 million adults in the US practiced meditation last year. Meditation, along with group activities that include yoga and guided meditation, are wonderful opportunities for LGBT seniors to relax and release some stress while also building community. Additional techniques for stress relief include:

  • keeping a journal
  • creating art
  • exercising
  • dancing
  • using essential oils to relax
  • downloading mobile apps for individual meditation
  • taking walks to enjoy nature

What are some techniques that you use to reduce stress?

Upcoming Events for LGBT Seniors:
The Affinity Trailblazers will host their annual dance “Dancing in Style,” Saturday evening, May 7, 2016 at the Caribbean Cove Restaurant. Please contact Affinity Community Services for more information: 773-324-0377

Affinity Community Services has also launched a care skills initiative called “Trailblazers Who Care” in collaboration with The Care Plan. They are pleased to present a FREE informative monthly workshop series on the 2nd Wednesday of every month from 6pm-8pm.  Please call to RSVP: 630-479-0083

New York
Every Monday through Thursday from 10am to 11am, SAGE Center Bronx hosts an open art studio. Spend the morning creating art with us! Our art supplies will be available for all to use. SAGE Center Bronx also hosts Yoga at 11am and Pilates at 12pm every Monday. Questions? SAGE Center Bronx, 718-960-3337, jcollazo@sageusa.org

Every Tuesday at 11am, SAGE-Griot Innovative Senior Center of Brooklyn hosts sitting Tai Chi. Designed for elders, this program will help those with arthritis and other ailments that prevent full movement. Questions? Aundaray Guess, 718-246-2775, aundaray@griotcircle.org

SAGE Center Harlem hosts a Zumba class every Tuesday and Thursday at 11am. Once you feel the rhythms of Latin and World music you’ll forget you’re in a “workout” session. Join us as we shake off calories with aerobic dance moves, one cha-cha step at a time. Consultant provided by Harlem Wellness Center. Questions? SAGE Center Harlem, 646-660-8951, sageharlem@sageusa.org

For a complete calendar of SAGE events, see http://www.sageusa.org/newsevents/calendar.cfm

NHCOA recently launched its new health, fitness, and wellness curriculum for Hispanic older adults called Move, Exercise, and Nourish. Read their blog to learn more about this exciting program, and stay tuned to NHCOA’s Facebook page to see when the program might be coming to your area!

The National Resource Center on LGBT Aging has a great Healthy Aging Toolkit for older adults, which includes myriad resources that can improve health and reduce stress.

Please share your events and resources with us on Facebook and Twitter!

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. What do you need to know as an LGBT older adult? Follow the SAGE blog this month for more!
April 28, 2016

Budgeting for Housing, Healthcare and Marriage Shouldn’t Be Scary

By Vera Lukacs

LGBT older adults have unique financial concerns. Not only are they faced with economic uncertainty, but they face discrimination in housing and healthcare, and the prospect of marriage is still new for many. How can LGBT older adults budget better for basic necessities? This question is important, considering that over 25 million older adults (60+) are living in poverty. Contrary to popular belief, planning and budgeting can be a positive experience! It can be tough to think about, but it’s worth doing when you have the chance to prepare and get a step ahead. Not sure where to start? Check out this LGBT Financial Planning Guide.

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Budgeting for healthcare in later years is incredibly important. LGBT older adults have a vast amount of needs that their heterosexual counterparts don’t even think about. But first, a significant factor in this process is LGBT elders need to feel comfortable sharing who they are with their healthcare providers. For transgender people seeking hormone treatments and surgeries or those with HIV, finding a provider can be a scary process. GLMA has a provider directory to help people find LGBT-competent healthcare providers.

LGBT older adults often struggle to find affordable and safe housing. Many don’t have the economic security to invest in long term care facilities, and many are denied housing simply for being who they are. Nearly half of older same-sex couples experienced at least one form of differential treatment when inquiring about housing in a long-term care facility. SAGE launched the National LGBT Elder Housing Initiative to address these issues.

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What does marriage equality mean for LGBT couples? See our new toolkit, Talk Before You Walk: Considerations for LGBT Older Couples Before Getting Married. Getting married is about more than bringing two individuals together. Marriage provides a number of benefits, rights, and protections. With these rights comes the sharing of financial liabilities. To ensure a secured household, talk with your partner before you walk!

Appointing a power of attorney can come in handy in an emergency. In the event that an LGBT older adult is incapacitated or otherwise unable to make sound decisions, a power of attorney can allow a trusted loved one to step in and decide on their behalf. For more information on planning your last wishes, see our blog Financial Literacy: Tips and Tricks for LGBT Elders!

Vera Lukacs is a digital media assistant at SAGE. April is Financial Literacy Month. What do you need to know as an LGBT older adult? Follow the SAGE blog this month for more!

November 18, 2013

The Unmeasured LGBT Life

Today’s post is from Robert Espinoza, Senior Director for Public Policy and Communications at SAGE. It was originally featured on The Huffington Post.

1robertI spent the summer of 2012 homebound, recovering alone in my 400-square-foot studio apartment in Brooklyn. A serious accident on Memorial Day led to ankle surgery, 12 weeks on crutches and the final stretch of August re-learning to walk. When you live alone and are relatively immobile, the days are epic, and the psyche churns with questions: Would I fully regain my ability to walk? Had I amassed the proper support network of friends at this stage in my adult life? And if I remained in New York City, a city fraught with opportunities yet rife with inequality, how should I plan for my aging as a queer person?

It was fitting, then, that I began working that summer on policy guidance to compel the New York State Department of Health to include LGBT-specific questions in its statewide patient assessment system for specific Medicaid-funded providers—a policy win announced this week. As I interviewed researchers and health leaders from around the country to grasp the implications, and as I schooled myself on the state of LGBT data collection, I found myself growing lonelier by the week. I couldn’t help picturing my later years at the mercy of providers and researchers who are indifferent, or even hostile, to my queer life.

I work daily on the politics that underlie these issues, and I’ve arrived at this proposition: as we age, each of us will reach a moment where we’ll need to ask for support in dealing with the frailty incurred through aging. But if we’re lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), the type of institutional support we receive at that point will rely largely on the questions that have already been asked about us. If we’re denied these data to craft relevant health interventions, we will perish off-screen in droves, measured only by the shallowest of statistics. 

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July 26, 2013

The Personal is Political: Eleanor’s Story

In honor of the 23rd Anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act, SAGE is pleased to share Eleanor Smith's story. Eleanor is the founder of Concrete Change, a disability rights organization in Decatur, GA. This is an excerpt of a speech she gave at SAGE’s LGBT Elder Institute, held in Atlanta, on January 24, 2013. Visit SAGE Story to listen to her full presentation.

Eleanor Smith
(image from Measure up the North
At my one of my first disability rights actions, in Washington DC about 30 years ago, as I was marching along in my wheelchair with a few hundred  others, a fellow marcher pulled up beside me in his power wheelchair and said, “Are you one of those old time dykes?”  I laughed and answered affirmatively. He could probably tell by the flannel shirt.  Later I got to know Eric better, and I learned from him that he was a female to male trans person. What a lot of guts he was showing back then in the 1980s to be a severely mobility-impaired person who also changed his gender. Back then Eric and I were young people with disabilities. Now we’re old people with disabilities. Today I’m going to talk about the intersection of aging and disability and the wisdom of older gays and people with disabilities working more closely together.


I have noticed how old people and their organizations and younger disabled people and their organizations often work quite separately from each other, and are unaware of each others’ work.  This is the case even though many of the same issues affect both groups.

We have been taught over the years to realize that all oppressions operate in similar ways. Ageism and ableism are even more closely intertwined that most oppressions. For instance, both older people and disabled people are often devalued because our bodies or minds deviate from the norm by being—or perceived as being—weaker and less functional.   And the physical attributes of both old people and people with disabilities of all ages are considered by many to be ugly, or grotesque. So we all need to be liberated to see old or disabled bodies as beautiful in their own way.

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