14 posts categorized "Arts & Culture"

June 14, 2016

Building Intergenerational LGBTQ AAPI Communities

This post originally appeared on the Diverse Elders Coalition blog on May 25, 2016. Read the original post here.

By Vega Subramaniam

I find myself attending LGBTQ Asian American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) events with less and less frequency over time. At one point, queer AAPI community events made up most of my calendar; now, hardly at all. Part of it is that other activities and responsibilities occupy my time, including family responsibilities. Part of it is that my tastes have changed – I am now much happier spending an evening with a few friends at home rather than going out. And speaking of going out: part of it is my lifestyle has changed. I was recently invited to an event that started at 10:00 p.m.! I mean, who does that?! Oh, right, I did, once upon a time.

And to be frank, part of it is that being the oldest person in the room over and over again takes a toll. I recently went on a search for my AAPI lesbian/bi/trans elders, and I (re)discovered how few of us there are, who are out and over 50. And over 60? Forget it. Like, count-on-two-hands few. Hardly what you could call critical mass.

At the same time, I can’t count the number of times I’ve heard people who are young, queer, and AAPI yearn for a connection to their elders and their histories, to know that others came before them and they’re not alone, and to learn from our experiences. Current leaders of LGBTQ AAPI groups are reassured to learn that the challenges and schisms they face now are the same ones we faced years and decades ago. OK, maybe reassured and also supremely frustrated.

So then I wonder where my compadres are. Well, they’re probably spending a quiet evening at home, or taking care of household and family responsibilities. Maybe sleeping. And circling back to those challenges and schisms I mentioned, probably as weary of the scene as I get sometimes.

There are inevitable constraints on what kinds of spaces naturally lend themselves to multigenerational participation (event start times, for example!). Our respective interests, frustrations, preoccupations are quite different from each other’s. Our cultural cues sometimes feel worlds apart.

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And as with any intergenerational space, opportunities to misunderstand and be misunderstood abound. We each feel that we know better, that we’re right, that the other should listen and learn from us. We each feel the pain and invisibility of ageism.

That said, it’s pretty clear that there’s a desire, on all sides, to have multigenerational spaces. We all light up when we spend quality time with people of different generations. There’s no question that multigenerational spaces support all of us – I’d even go so far as to say we need them for our survival as an LGBTQ AAPI community.

The International Longevity Centre-UK’s “Intergenerational Projects for the LGBT Community” toolkit outlines the many benefits of such spaces:

  • Provide a space where young people can talk to older people about common experiences (such as coming out).
  • Provide role models for younger LGBT people by meeting older people who are comfortable and confident in their identity and who are simultaneously successful in their working lives and personal relationships.
  • Provide a space where any negative generational perceptions can be challenged. Some younger participants in the projects reported that they held negative views of older LGBT people before the projects began. From the perspective of older LGBT people, the projects allow older LGBT people to learn about the diversity of sexual and gender identities that exist among younger LGBT people.
  • Help prevent and overcome a relatively high degree of loneliness and social isolation among older and younger LGBT people, by bringing them together.
  • Provide an alternative forum for debate and support for younger and older LGBT people to discuss their common needs as service users and the discrimination or barriers they may face in accessing services.
  • Provide a space where older people can interact socially with younger people and improve the confidence of older people in communicating with younger people, which may be of particular value given that service providers are likely to be of a younger generation.
  • Provide a useful way of bringing different identities across the LGBT spectrum together, where historically projects may have worked with one group in isolation.
  • Allow younger LGBT people to learn about LGBT history directly from older people, which can lead to a greater appreciation of the liberties currently often taken for granted, and also highlight the challenges that remain.
  • Provide a method for strengthening the visibility of the LGBT community in wider societal terms. Bringing older and younger people together to work on a community project can highlight the diversity, but also the cohesiveness of the LGBT community, to the wider community.
  • Help participants understand, construct, and share their experiences of identifying as LGBT.

We’re seeing more intentional work to create intergenerational spaces, in projects ranging from LGBTQ Allyship’s Conversations Across Generationsto UC San Diego’s Intergenerational Dialogue.

While it’s heartening to see more groups and communities working to build those spaces (and even a toolkit specifically for this!), few are geared toward the AAPI community. The API Equality-Northern California’s Dragon Fruit Project, an intergenerational oral history project, offers a wonderful place to share our stories, house our legacies, and learn from one another. We’ve also seen other efforts at local levels to offer multigenerational gatherings and learning opportunities.

 

I’d also promote intergenerational co-mentorship programs, ones that foster what Suzanne Pharr calls “the fundamental belief that we are all people of worth. Its methods are asking questions and listening intently and respectfully for the answers. Where it leads us is toward the sometimes illusive dream of equality and justice – which can contain all our best ideas without requiring an age i.d.” We all can use some retooling of our toolkits, like learning to ask questions and listen intently about how concepts of race and gender have changed over the years and how those changes affect our experiences as people who are L, G, B, T, and /or Q.

Ultimately, my hope is that as we do approach a critical mass of out LGBTQ AAPI seniors, we increasingly build intentional intergenerational spaces, until they’re so organically embedded that we no longer have to work at it or even think about it.

Watch and share the recent video of SAGE’s Transgenerational Theater Project, where trans people of all ages come together and create.

June 9, 2016

Celebrating LGBT Heroes of Pride

It’s the first full week of Pride Month 2016 and the LGBT community is off to an exciting start. On May 31st, President Obama proclaimed June as LGBT Pride Month, calling upon the country to "eliminate prejudice everywhere it exists, and to celebrate the great diversity of the American people." SAGE is grateful for this special recognition of a longtime tradition that's brought the LGBT community together.

During Pride Month with celebrations nationwide, the LGBT community and its allies remember the historic Stonewall Riots that happened in New York City in 1969. This year is particularly special, as we mark the first anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Obergefell marriage decision.

Join SAGE as we recognize the Heroes of Pride — LGBT trailblazers who have fought long and hard to make a better life for all of us — and reaffirm our love for friends, family and each other. If you’re in the New York area, please join us for these upcoming Pride events, and visit our SAGENet Affiliate websites to find out how you can celebrate in a city near you.

Brooklyn Pride: Saturday, June 11
Harlem Pride: Saturday, June 25
Manhattan Pride: Sunday, June 26
Bronx Pride: Saturday, July 16

If you missed our booth at Queens Pride on June 5, here's a photo of SAGE staff spreading the love:

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Visit our Pride 2016! photo album on Facebook

Other important tributes in June:

On Saturday, June 4, to kick off the summer season, SAGE held its 24th Annual Celebration in the Pines, honoring Eric Sawyer, Linda Gottlieb, Marc Cote & Jay Henry. See photos on Facebook.

On Sunday, June 5, for HIV Long-Term Survivors Awareness Day, we paid tribute on social to LGBT elders living with HIV. Today more than half of the 1.2 million people living with HIV in the U.S. are over the age of 50. While HIV has become more like managing a chronic disease, many long-term survivors are facing new crises that affect their physical, mental and financial well-being. Follow the conversation and show your support on social media with #‎LongTermSurvivors.

On Friday, June 10, the Chicago-based National Board Members of SAGE will host its annual SAGE & Friends reception, where SAGE will honor U.S. Congressman Mike Quigley, co-chair of the Congressional LGBT Caucus, for his advocacy on behalf of LGBT rights and his support of issues impacting older individuals. SAGE will also recognize Phyllis Johnson and Torlene "Toi" Williams for their pioneering Affinity Community Services' Trailblazers, and for their grassroots advocacy on behalf of LGBT older adults in Chicago.

Legend
'Legends' gather for the exhibition reception at Leslie-Lohman.

Also this month, SAGE is celebrating our LGBT elders of color with a series of powerful yet understated photographs of unsung Black LGBTQ 'legends,' now on display through August 12 at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art in New York. Read more and see images from the project here.

In the words of President Obama:

This journey, led by forward-thinking individuals who have set their sights on reaching for a brighter tomorrow, has never been easy or smooth.  The fight for dignity and equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people is reflected in the tireless dedication of advocates and allies who strive to forge a more inclusive society.  They have spurred sweeping progress by changing hearts and minds and by demanding equal treatment -- under our laws, from our courts, and in our politics.  This month, we recognize all they have done to bring us to this point, and we recommit to bending the arc of our Nation toward justice.

Stay tuned this month for Pride 2016 updates and follow the SAGE blog as we celebrate LGBT Heroes Of Pride in June and beyond. Follow and share on social with hash tag #HeroesOfPride.

 

January 11, 2016

The Secret to a Long Life

When the New York Times asked for videos that capture the secrets that adults over 85 had for living a long life, SAGE jumped in to action to ensure that LGBT older adults were featured.  In this compilation by the Times, four of our constituents were featured.  

Starting at 1:13, Jerre Kalbas, 97, stated "hard work." Richard Morse, 90, said "Don't stop breathing. Don't kvetch and respect others for who they are." Joe Easter, 87, spoke of a passion for painting that "keeps him [me] going." Catherine Cumberbatch, 93 and pictured above, offered this: "Be aware of the pleasure that you get when you give something or do something for people that really need it."  

With Catherine's words in mind, we ask you to take three minutes to complete SAGE's Strategic Plan survey that will inform our work for years to come. We are soliciting input from all of our valued stakeholders and community members in order to bring LGBT elders from the margins to the middle. Allies and people under 50 are welcome, so please take the survey and share widely!

February 24, 2015

Sounds of Conversation: Bringing Together Our LGBT Older Adults & Youth

In honor of Black History Month, SAGE presents "Sounds of Conversation," a video featuring voices of SAGE Harlem Center participants and youth from community partners, The Ali Forney Center and the Center Youth. These groups all took part in an Intergenerational Storytelling Project sponsored by a grant Keith Haring Foundation.

"Sounds of Conversation," allowed SAGE to bring LGBT older adults and youth together for an artist workshop that allowed each of the participant an opportunity to exchange personal narratives and create a theatrical piece for their respective communities.  The workshops were conducted over a series of Saturdays in the summer of 2014 at the SAGE Center Harlem location. The theatrical piece was performed on September 11th at the Producers Club, which is located within the famed theater district of New York City.  This video highlights the process and the performance of "Sounds of Conversation." To view another video of this workshop, visit our YouTube channel.

August 21, 2014

Rethinking the Term “Senior Citizen”

Today is National Senior Citizen’s Day, which is a great opportunity to look at the role age and aging play in all of our lives. Many people are familiar with terms like racism or sexism—but here at SAGE we spend a lot of time thinking about ageism. Ageism is the act of stereotyping and forming prejudices about people or groups based on their age. It can take many forms, from assuming that all teenagers are irresponsible to passing over an older adult’s job application because of their age.

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One important way that we combat these different ‘-isms’ is to learn how to speak to others with respect and understanding. The language we use in our everyday lives has a tremendous impact, not only on our personal relationships, but on the national conversation around diversity and inclusion. For example, when I’m conduction our LGBT cultural competency trainings, I have all the participants say ‘LGBT’ out loud four of five times. After this activity people that have never even said the word LGBT can say it smoothly and without stumbling over the letters, which is an important way to demonstrate that you’re an ally to the LGBT community!

Given the power of language, today is a great time to explain why SAGE chooses not to use the term “senior citizen” in our work. Calling someone a senior citizen places them into a category simply based on their age. Along with this category come many other assumptions about what older adults can and cannot do.

‘Senior citizen’ is just one of a few terms used to describe older adults that are increasingly rejected. A 2012 article in the New York Timesdiscussed this shift in language, noting that other terms like ‘elderly’ are also falling out of favor.

Whatever the label, anytime you see someone first and foremost as a member of a group, it makes it more difficult to see that person in all of their uniqueness. At SAGE we strive to see everyone as individuals with their own strengths and weaknesses, not just as members of a certain generation. Removing ageist assumptions or language for our collective vocabulary is an important part of doing our work, and that’s why we don’t call our constituents senior citizens.

There may be times when it’s very important to talk about older people as a group, and in those moments we prefer the term ‘older adults’. It allows us to speak to a set of shared experiences, without bringing along a lot of the baggage and stereotypes associated with ‘senior citizens’.

After all, as one style guide points out, we don’t refer to people under age 50 as ‘junior citizens,’ so why create a special category just for older people?

What term do you use to describe yourself? Which terms do you love, and which do you dislike? Let us know in the comments! 

--Posted by Tim Johnston, PhD

March 12, 2014

Celebrating Women's History Month

IMG_1123SAGE's strong women's community has led to many women-centric programming throughout the organization. The arrival of Felicia Sobel, LCSW, as our Women's Programming Coordinator in 2011 solidified our committement to providing quality events and programs to reflect the breadth of interests of LBT women. Too often, aging is equated with decline and diminishing strengths. On the contrary, growing older means reaching a life stage where friendships deepen, values intensify, goals (old and new) crystallize, wisdom emerges and interests often flourish.

IMG_1692This month, in honor of Women's History Month, we are highlighting all of our women's programs and events. Feel free to stop by The SAGE Center or SAGE Harlem to take part in one of our many women's groups, or attend one of our upcoming dances or lectures!

Special Events:

SAGE & Henrietta Hudson St. Patrick's Tea Dance
March 16, 2014
3:00 - 9:00 pm at Henrietta Hudson, 438 Hudson Street, NYC
Celebrate and dance the day away at a special St. Paddy's Day Tea Dance at the legendary Henrietta Hudson! $10 at the door and all proceeds go to SAGE!

Celebrate Women's History Month with SAGE
March 21, 2014
7:00 - 8:30 pm at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, NYC
Hear published women writers read from their work and join us for a Q & A session.  This stimulating event will feature readings by novelist Kathleen Collins; author-publisher Jan Freeman; playwright Barbara Kahn; writer Jaye McNeil; and poet Chocolate Waters. Contributions appreciated, but not necessary and all are welcome!

The Best Women's Dance in NYC: Spring Edition
May 4, 2014
3:30 - 8:30 pm at Club LQ, 511 Lexington Ave, NYC
The Best Women's Dance in NYC is back in May after a successful winter dance in January! Celebrate with friends, old and new, and join us for our triannual tradition! $20 in advance/$25 at the door - get your tickets here!

Special Programs:

Ask the Docs For Women: Workshop on Women's Health
March 24, 2014
3:00 - 4:30 PM at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, NYC
The SAGE Center has partnered with Beth Israel Medical Center to provide a monthly series addressing health concerns that LGBT older adults face.  Join us this month for a workshop specifically geared towards women’s health.

SHE (Strong. Healthy. Energized) Fitness Program
April 2, 2014 - June 18, 2014
2:00 - 3:00 pm at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, NYC
SAGE has announced its second offering of the SHE (Strong. Healthy. Energized) FREE fitness program, which is a holistic series of 12 sessions that include exercises, nutritional and cooking information as well as discussions. The goal is to help participants (overweight lesbians and bisexual women over 60) approach fitness and weight issues in a comfortable, fun atmosphere.  RSVP to Felicia: fsobel@sageusa.org or call her at 212-741-2247.

Ongoing Programs/Groups:

Women: Our Evolving Lives with Felicia
Weekly on Tuesdays
6:00 - 7:30 pm at SAGE, 305 7th Avenue, 6th Floor, Conference Room 1, NYC
Women-only discussion group for those who wish to talk in a welcoming and open environment.  Please contact Felicia for more information.

Women's Support Group
Weekly on Wednesdays
3:30 - 5:30 pm at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, NYC
A welcoming support group for women who need to need to talk or listen in a comfortable and supportive atmosphere. Experience the empowerment of this peer-led group.

Women's Group: Relationships with Felicia
Weekly on Thursdays
3:30 - 5:30 pm at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, NYC
This free group requires pre-registration. Contact Felicia for more information and to register. This women-led group is a safe place to talk about relationships and whatever else is going on in life. 

Trans Women's Group
2nd Thursday of the Month
6:30 - 8:30 pm at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Avenue, 15th Floor, NYC
A recent discussion group faciliated by Jackie and Asia. Open to all transgender women who would like to talk about life and issues in a supportive and welcoming environment.

SAGE Harlem Women's 40+ Support Group
1st Friday of the month
6:00 - 8:00 pm at SAGE Harlem, 2090 Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Blvd., Suite 201, NYC
Support Group by and for lesbian and bisexual 40+ women.  Refreshments served and new-comers welcome.  Come meet friends and SAGE staff in a supportive and welcoming atmosphere.

February 4, 2014

SAGE Celebrates Black History Month

February, in addition to being LGBT History Month in the U.K., is African American History Month. SAGE will be celebrating with a variety of programs designed by The SAGE Center and our SAGE Harlem teams. We will also be highlighting the stories of our SAGE members from around the country in the next few weeks, so be sure to bookmark the SAGE Blog and visit often!

Patricia_fraserThe following post was written by Patricia Fraser-Morales, SAGE Harlem Program Assistant.

SAGE Harlem is working on some exciting offerings to commemorate Black History Month. Our staff and volunteers have created an art exhibition on the walls of the Harlem Center to showcase the diverse talents of our constituents. This begins an initiative we hope to continue all year long, with revolving art pieces and poetry selections to illustrate our chosen theme: “Life in Harlem.”

 To keep consistent with the arts theme, SAGE Harlem is collaborating this month with the Romare Bearden Foundation, located on the second floor of the historic Hotel Theresa Building.  We will be offering small group tours of the Bearden archive, which features art pieces, writings, and other memorabilia of the famous artist. 

More Black History Month Events:

All of SAGE has been invited to attend a special afternoon screening of The New Black at the Film Forum. The New Black is a documentary that tells the story of how the African-American community is grappling with the gay rights issue in light of the recent gay marriage movement and the fight over civil rights. SAGE is planning to have a Q&A with the creators of the film at a later date.

SAGE Harlem is offering multiple screenings of the classic Paris is Burning at the Harlem Center.  On February 18, there will be a presentation on the history of the ballroom scene given by scholar/activist Michael Roberson, who is the Father of the House of Garcon.

Harlem Nights_piece by Harlem Constituent Frances Gordon
Harlem Nights, painted by SAGE Harlem Constituent, Francis Gordon

Our regular programming for the month includes all support groups and activities:

  • Women’s 40+ Support Group on Friday, February 7
  • Latino Men’s Group on Tuesday, February 11
  • Men’s 50+ Support on Friday, February 14
  • Grief Group on Saturdays, February 8 & 15
  • New Beginnings every Tuesday afternoon
  • AA Meditation every Monday night
  • Spirituality Group on the 2nd and 4th Mondays
  • Buddy to Buddy on Thursday, February 20

The H.E.A.T. Meeting and Social Hour on Friday, February 21st, and Fabulous Friday on Friday, February 28th round out the month-long celebrations.  Please “like” us on Facebook, and check out the website for more information on dates, times and more offerings.

 

January 22, 2014

Stu Maddux to Receive the SAGE Advocacy Award at Creating Change 2014

StuSAGE is pleased to announce that the 2014 recipient of our annual SAGE Advocacy Award for Excellence in Leadership on Aging Issues is Stu Maddux, the award winning producer and director of independent documentaries about LGBTQ and LGBTQ history, including the remarkable and massively influential Gen Silent—which chronicles the lives of six LGBT elders as they navigate aging, caregiving, terminal illness, and loss.

In the last few decades, documentaries have had a profound impact on shifting public opinion, on raising awareness about important-though-neglected social issues, and on propelling forward a justice movement for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights. But in the context of LGBT aging, no film has had a more profound impact on bringing to light the struggles of LGBT older people in the long-term care system than the documentary, Gen Silent. The award-winning documentary follows the lives of six LGBT elders in Boston—a beautiful though heart-wrenching film journey—yet its broader gift has been to animate a grassroots movement in support of LGBT elders, inspiring activists of all ages, all along the way.

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July 29, 2013

Extra! Extra!

Read the latest issue of SAGEMatters, Summer 2013 edition! We've got articles on LGBT affordable housing, a rundown of our achievements over the past 5 years, features on our national programs and more! Download your own copy or use the Issuu reader below.

 

July 17, 2013

SAGE and The Moth Present....

Did you know that SAGE and The Moth colloborated in two SAGE Story workshops this Spring and Summer? The Moth, an award-winning storytelling program, taught SAGE members how to craft and share their own personal story in a unique and vibrant way. Today, we share a special slideshow of the two workshop finales and the stories of two members, Frans Bloem and Charles Fattone. Watch, like and share!

Interested in learning more about SAGE Story? Visit us on the web and share your story today